6 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT HIV/AIDS -AND WHY THEY’RE NOT TRUE

When AIDS first made headlines back in the 1980s, there was numerous  misinformation surrounding the newly-discovered disease existed.   Today, despite all of the information made available about HIV/AIDS,  there are still so many common misconceptions floating around.  This article will set the record straight and answer questions you may be wondering—or are too afraid to ask.  Here are six of the most common myths about HIV/AIDS—and the   facts to counter them. 1: HIV/AIDS IS NO LONGER A CRISIS You might not see HIV/AIDS on the news every day like it once was back when the disease was first discovered—  but the crisis is far from over.    Roughly 3 new people are infected with HIV every minute, and this year, one million people will die of AIDS-related illnesses. These numbers should be front page news.   Yes, the world has come a long way in the fight against AIDS, but unless we act now, all the progress we’ve gained is in incredibly jeopardy. We know how to end this disease once and for all—and we need your help in doing it.  #2: YOU CAN CONTRACT HIV FROM TOUCHING SOMEONE WHO IS HIV+ False. According to the Center for Disease Control, HIV can NOT be transmitted through air, water, saliva, sweat, tears or sharing a toilet—meaning you can’t catch it from breathing the same air as an HIV+ person, or hugging, kissing, or shaking hands.  The virus can only be transmitted through certain body fluids like blood, semen, vaginal fluid, rectal fluid, or breast milk. Therefore, it’s often transmitted through sex, when protection is not used, and needle or syringe use.  The virus can also be passed from mother to child during pregnancy if the mother is not accessing antiretroviral medication.  In instances of sex between an HIV-positive and an HIV-negative partner, condoms are highly effective in preventing the transmission of HIV. When condoms are paired with antiretroviral medication, they provide even more protection.[…]